How To: Decide on a Wedding Ring

Auckland Celebrant

 

“I wear this ring on my skin
As a symbol of my commitment to you and our family.
Although the ink may fade with time
My love for you never will.
Each and every day, I will be proud to be your husband.”

 

 

Legally you are not required to exchange rings in order to be married in New Zealand.  This weekend I was fortunate to work with a couple who chose to get matching tamoko on their ring fingers instead of the traditional band of gold.

The words said in the ceremony being:

Today, R and C, have chosen to express their commitment through tamoko rings, and for the rest of their lives they will wear the vows and promises they have made today on their skin.”  It was a touching and beautiful way to acknowledge their journey and their marriage.

It is entirely up to you as to whether or not you exchange rings, exchange some other token or do something entirely different.  So how do you choose the right wedding ring (or wedding token) for you?  As a couple you have decide what fits you.  Then its time to start looking!

I love working with couples to get the right fit for their big day and believe that it really is all about you and your love, so please get in touch if you are looking for something unique for your big day.

 

FYI: So why do we exchange rings?

“Wedding rings through different stages in history have been worn on different fingers, including the thumb, and on both the left and right hands. According to  a tradition believed to have been derived from the Romans, the wedding ring is worn on the left hand ring finger because there was thought to be a vein in the finger, referred to as the ‘Vena Amoris’ or the ‘Vein of Love’ said to be directly connected to the heart. However, scientists have shown this is actually false. Despite this, this myth still remains regarded by many (hopeless romantics) as the number one reason rings are worn on the fourth finger.”

For more head to this great article.

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